The three courses of the minor

The minor consists of three related courses: ‘Digital Humanities: How to get Started‘, ‘Digital Visual and Narrative Culture‘ and ‘Handling Digital Data in Practice‘. Its overall goal is to illustrate the impact of the digital turn on academic research. Students are offered the chance to improve their digital skills by gaining insights in the mechanisms behind search engines and Digital Humanities projects and by practicing with digital assignments.

Advertisements

Digital Humanities: How to get Started

The concept of ‘Digital Scholarship’ is relatively young and refers to the revolutionary changes in academic research brought about by the digital turn. This course discusses its history and the basic skills that are required to engage with sources of information in digital form. Besides discussing basic terms and structures such as online media, digital archives, metadata, ‘open access’ and deep web search engines, the students will engage with digital data and tools through weekly assignments. These can vary from contributing to a wiki, a storytelling project or a crowd sourcing initiative, to publishing an enhanced publication, depending on the level of digital literacy.

Lecturers:

Course Materials

The course manual will be available from September 2014. For the course manual of 2013, see Archive.

,……

Handling digital data in practice

The students will engage in a series of four workshops (each taking two sessions), in which various types of data and corresponding digital tools will be discussed. In Workshop 1 the students will work with structured data (databases), information that is organized in clear structures such as tables, and that can easily be processed and searched. After an introduction to the design of databases and the methods for downloading and enriching online data, students will put their acquired knowledge into practice. Workshop 2 is organized around the ‘digitization chain’, which means the subsequent steps that are necessary to turn a printed textual object, a bible text or a policy report, into a digital object that can be searched for and accessed online. In Workshop 3 the subject is Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and students will learn how to create and reuse digital (historical) maps. In Workshop 4 the central theme is the visualization of social media data. Students will learn how patterns in information streams such as Twitter messages can be presented in comprehensive ways through a tool that visualizes frequencies, relations and networks. For each of the four workshops students are expected to deliver a digital product. The best results will be presented on the website of the minor.

Lecturers:

Course Materials:

The course manual will be available from September 2014. For the course manual of 2013, see Archive.

Projects created by students in the course “Handling Digital Data in Practice” in 2013

…..

…..

Digital Visual and Narrative Culture

Digital technology and the emergence of the world wide web have multiplied the amount of encounters we have with (moving) images and personal stories. Due to the availability of simple and affordable technology, the ability to photograph or film events or to record people’s experiences has come within anybody’s reach. This has contributed to the development of a participatory digital visual and narrative culture. We will discuss the most important insights from studies of visual and oral culture, analyse different types of audiovisual formats and content, explore visual archives and take a look into the future of audiovisual analysis. The key term in this course is the ‘semantic gap’: the difference between the images we see and the words we use to describe them. We will explore the dimensions of this term through two major assignments. For one of these we will team up with the Nationaal Archief (Dutch National Archives) to compare their own descriptions of pictures from their collection to those provided by Flickr users on the same collection. For non Dutch speakers there are ample challenging alternatives. The best results will be published on the website of the minor as an enhanced essay.

Lecturer

Course Materials

The course manual will be available from September 2014. For the course manual of 2013, see Archive.

Projects created by students in the course “Digital Visual Culture” in 2013.

….